Saturday, June 24, 2017

[Guest Post] Imogen's Typewriter Review of Wonder Boy!

Hey everyone! 

Today on the blog I have a guest post by Imogen Imogen's Typewriter !! Thank you, Imogen, for guest posting. Check out the full guest post below!

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Now, I loved Nicole Burstein’s first book; Othergirl and gave it a glowing review on my blog so I, of course, picked up her second book when I went to YALC. Then didn't read it for a year. Mood readers, eh? But I knew I would love it, and I knew it would (hopefully) make a good review for Sabrina’s wonderful blog! So here we go...


Joseph ‘Wilco’ Wilkes is one of life’s loser’s – he’s picked on, pushed around, and bullied by the rugby boys at the posh private school he attends on a scholarship. But his life is about to change: Wilco learns he can move things with his mind. Will this be his chance to play the hero, get the girl and finally stand up for himself? Or are things just going to come crashing down around his head? Becoming a proper hero will be quite the leap of faith...

This book is, for me, one of the few perfect middle grade/ early teen books. It puts kids problems in an understandable, but different environment of a contemporary world plus superheroes. The overarching storyline was clever and superheroes are always fun to read about, but this origin story is so much more while still written in a beautifully simple way. I finished it in a day and while I'm a grown-up, I can't imagine anybody getting stuck in this one. Guaranteed slump-buster.

Even with superheroes though, I rarely thought about that part of the book while collecting my thoughts after finishing. Much like the first book, Wonderboy deals a lot with friendship but also with bullies, the value of education and working hard, the pressure of private schools, first relationships... And although this book doesn't have any LGBT+ representation, there is a lovely part where Joseph's friend is reassuring him that it wouldn't affect their friendship if he were gay.

And this was also amazing because boys talking about their feelings. I read a lot of 'boy books' as a kid, having an older brother, and it's genuinely refreshing to read a book where boys talk to each other about feelings without bluster or banter. The main character and his best friend are honest and trusting with each other, and I love it.

Wonderboy is the second book in a duology but they're companion novels, rather than a series.  Nicole Burstein has done a great job adding throwbacks to Othergirl which are great, but don't in anyway effect the reading of this book.


Start with Othergirl, start with Wonderboy, just start this series. Both of the books are fantastic. Exactly the kinds of books that everyone will enjoy, but should definitely be put into the hands of young teenagers. The morals are on-point without being obvious and they're just fun to read!

No comments:

Post a Comment